This kid rapper’s freestyle from Mushin goes really hard, but there is something terribly wrong too

Kid rapper from Mushin goes hard. Names himself as next to Olamide

A short 30-second clip of the video featuring what many are already calling the next king of indigenous rap surfaced on video Facebook last year and it has been making rounds on social media ever since.

The video stars an unnamed child rapper who identifies himself simply as “Young Star” spitting gritty rhymes without any instrumentation through the video’s run time.

With the 30-second cut not nearly enough to immersively appreciate Young Star’s rap, a longer cut of the video has surfaced on the internet. On this updated clip, Young Star is able to spit bars like any skilled MC to provide some context about his Mushin background and, hints of his struggles plus something we found utterly disturbing.

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Though there are still no details anywhere about Young Star as a person or his music, the wordsmith is clearly young and a rough guess will place his age at pre-adolescent years.

So it was quite unsettling to hear him rap about things even adults would find weighty to boldly utter even if they had to waft it around sleek rhymes. Young Star raps prodigiously about things one should never hear from a child. And as statuesque as his rhymes and wordplay were to watch, it was cringe-worthy to listen to a child spew misogynist garbage about the female form and what we sincerely hope are fantasies about having sex. (If you don’t understand Yoruba, ask someone to translate)

Like what the actual fuck?

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We feel almost inclined to view this from the multiplicity of economic and socio-political factors that could create an environment for a child to grow up so foul mouthed. From this angle, this young talent obviously acquired his “colourful” vocabulary from the likes of Olamide, Lil Kesh, Reminisce amongst other artistes whose lyricism consists solely of flagrant expletives that objectify women and offend the female gender in ways we cannot even begin to comprehend.

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Critics have raised the issue of lewd content but it is often dismissed “as what the people want to hear”. But do those people include kids like Young Star who don’t know any better and worse still, live in environments where such lifestyles are glorified?

Don’t get us wrong, for a pubescent rapper, Young Star is actually an equal match to any Nigerian rapper worth his bars. But he is the product of an environment where nothing is censored or left to the imagination and music videos are plastered with vibrating butts and iterated lyrics about fucking women.

Someone needs to stop this madness.

Agreed, hip hop has been riddled with this anti-women emblem as a genre curse. West Coast rappers have come under fire many times for suggestive and implied lyrics identifying women as nothing but sex objects, touching on issues of rape and abuse in the same stance.

But the world is changing. The most successful rap albums of the last 5 years, from Kanye West to Kendrick Lamar have swayed away from such subject matters to open discussions for issues that range from racism to relationships and even mental health.

Nigerian music should be moving with the times, to tell similar stories and experiences from perspectives of people who have seen these things happen and made it out so kids can pick models they can emulate or, at least, keep their mouths clean.

Young Star bears the mark of DaGrin’s amoral edge and Olamide’s braggart vibe, but that’s all we will tolerate from him.

Nothing more, nothing less.

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